About me

I am an architect. I am also practical, maybe because I was born into a constructor’s family. To blend aesthetics and functionality in a project that comes to life when it should, would be the absolute praise for my work. This is why I respect project management so much. So this is me: architect and project manager. The rest is more or less personal with the exception of art and my love for it.







About me

I am an architect. I am also practical, maybe because I was born into a constructor’s family. To blend aesthetics and functionality in a project that comes to life when it should, would be the absolute praise for my work. This is why I respect project management so much. So this is me: architect and project manager. The rest is more or less personal with the exception of art and my love for it.



I graduated from the School of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. They do a good job teaching design and structure as well as mechanics and materials. It worked for me: my design thesis was selected by the Fundació Mies van der Rohe, as one of the four Greek candidates for the Young Talent Architecture Award YTAA 2016.



During my year at the École Nationale Supérieure d'Architecture de Paris-La Villette, I developed the ability to analyze complex city conditions and handle information flows. A truly great experience participating in workshops in advanced spatial formation, design and computation; a fascinating game of dynamic forms and structural skins, which gave me a deeper comprehension of architecture.



All the while I spent my free time at my father’s construction company only to realise the distance between academia and real life projects. Proper project management seemed the right way to bridge this distance. I wished to dive deeper into this field and began working as intern for Faithful+Gould, on the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center project, designed by Renzo Piano. It is widely considered to be a unique building project with exceptional environmental, technical and innovative standards in the field of the Greek construction industry.



My performance persuaded them to keep me in Athens for another 18 months until the completion of the project. My activities there involved day-to-day site monitoring, contractors’ technical submittals reviews, mapping of project schedules and budgets, working with the ACONEX management software, monitoring the work of subcontractors for the USGBC LEED Certification process, overseeing archeological work, attending regular and emergency meetings…even monitoring park shrubs at nurseries and guiding site visitors. Probably the most intense months of my life... 



Taking this experience into account, I have realized that construction is becoming more complicated from an operational, technical, planning, legal and organizational perspective, so the need for management is imperative, even for small projects.

 



For example, at the renovation of a seaside house my project targets were energy generation upgrades, functional improvement, and aesthetic enhancement.  It was essential that I implemented the proper measures against any potential hazard during the construction and aimed at the best combination of execution time (as the the building was already in use during site work), cost and quality.

In another example I am currently carrying out a preliminary study on a housing estate of approximately 40 holiday houses on the first peninsula of Halkidiki. It requires both architectural aspiration and optimal commercial exploitation with careful compliance to the legal and economic requirements of the market.



This is a challenge for me. For all the projects above - large, medium and small scale projects - according to my experience (so far), it was essential that I was both an architect and a project manager. Both the SNFCC and seaside housing complexes highlight the importance of this double identity. The initial idea and vision of the creator is less likely to be compromised when the architect keeps this dual role at the front of his mind. 



It is my firm belief that architects should be flexible, dynamic, not one-dimensional and meet the needs of a constantly evolving reality, at all levels of architectural design. Today, architectural practice in Greece should seek to find new design and construction aspects which lead to sustainable developments for the tourism industry and beyond. It needs to respect the many factors affecting the construction industry, such as economic investment and technical progress, and remembering that Greece is the place of sun, sea, and hospitality.



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